Rayon: “Aristocrats of Fashion” ~ 1940 American Bemberg

Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney more at http://quickfound.net/ Fashions for sport and evening wear, all made from Bemberg rayon. Narration: Muriel Evans. Photography: William Steiner… In Technicolor. Originally a public domain film, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with…

Rayon: "Aristocrats of Fashion" ~ 1940 American Bemberg

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Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney

more at http://quickfound.net/

Fashions for sport and evening wear, all made from Bemberg rayon. Narration: Muriel Evans. Photography: William Steiner… In Technicolor.

Originally a public domain film, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._P._Bemberg
Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

J. P. Bemberg was a German rayon manufacturer that produced an unusually fine artificial fiber which became known as Bemberg®. J. P. Bemberg came under the control of Vereinigte Glanzstoff-Fabriken and eventually disappeared after a series of mergers and divestitures, but Bemberg™ rayon was still being produced in 2015 by Asahi in Japan…

J. P. Bemberg began to produce artificial textile fiber commercially using the cuprammonium process in 1897. The company went public as J. P. Bemberg AG in 1903. In 1901 Dr Edmund Thiele developed a stretch-spinning system for J. P. Bemberg, which began to produce fine-filament artificial silk under the Bemberg® trademark in 1908. With this process J. P. Bemberg was able to make rayon using the cuprammonium process with filaments of 1–1.5 denier, comparable to Chardonnet silk and physically superior. The process did not have the flammability problems of Hilaire de Chardonnet’s process, but could not compete with the viscose process except where very fine filament was needed. Costs were higher than with viscose rayon due to the need to use copper salts and cotton for the cellulose…

American Bemberg

The Bemberg technology was licensed to the American Bemberg Corp, founded in Elizabethton, Tennessee in 1925. American Bemberg began manufacturing cuprammonium rayon at Elizabethton in October 1926. There were several small strikes at the plant in 1927 and 1928. In August 1928 the VGF subsidiary American Glanzstoff opened a viscose plant in the same town. The two plants had more than 3,000 workers by the end of 1928. Both suffered from labor problems throughout the 1930s, but production grew steadily. In 1933 the American Bemberg Corp. staged a fashion show in which the models wore fabrics woven from Bemberg yarns, or from these yarns combined with silk or other types of rayon. American Bemberg increased production during World War II, and made parachute cloth…

…in December 1948 they were sold to Beaunit Mills of New York. Demand for rayon dropped after the war. In the 1950s the Bemberg facility began to manufacture polyester. The Bemberg plant was in serious financial trouble by the early 1970s, and could not comply with demands to reduce toxic waste emissions from the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The plant was sold and resold, and finally filed for bankruptcy on 16 February 1974…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rayon

Rayon is a manufactured fiber made from regenerated cellulose fiber. The many types and grades of rayon can imitate the feel and texture of natural fibers such as silk, wool, cotton, and linen. The types that resemble silk are often called artificial silk.

Since rayon is manufactured from naturally occurring polymers, it is not considered to be synthetic. Technically, the term synthetic fiber is reserved for fully synthetic fibers. In manufacturing terms, rayon is classified as “a fiber formed by regenerating natural materials into a usable form”. Specific types of rayon include viscose, modal and lyocell, each of which differs in manufacturing process and properties of the finished product.

Rayon is made from purified cellulose, harvested primarily from wood pulp, which is chemically converted into a soluble compound. It is then dissolved and forced through a spinneret to produce filaments which are chemically solidified, resulting in fibers of nearly pure cellulose. Unless the chemicals are handled carefully, workers can be seriously harmed by the carbon disulfide used to manufacture most rayon…

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